A Personal Story: Insurance Issues – Melinda & Dave, Orford


Melinda and Dave live in Orford, New Hampshire and have four children. Dave’s job offers dental insurance, but the rates are high. “We do have dental insurance available to us but. . . the family rate is so much higher than the individual rate, that unless you are going to have a lot of work done it doesn’t make sense financially to have the insurance for your kids. It’s cheaper to pay for expensive stuff out of pocket than to pay the higher rate for kids to be on our plan. . . We also have a dentist who we love that is not on the preferred provider list, and so it’s more expensive than if we had found somebody else. We’ve chosen to stay with her because we like her, we think she does good quality work, and we have a connection there. But it costs us more money.” Melinda explains that although the recommendation for cleanings is every six months, she tends to schedule cleanings for every eight months or so, in order to save money.

One of Melinda and Dave’s children, Angela, has special needs and is eligible for Medicaid. Because of her special needs she goes to a different dentist than the rest of the family, one who specializes in pediatric dentistry. Melinda feels that New Hampshire Medicaid is very good about dental care. They send regular reminders to go to the dentist, and they cover everything fully. Angela needed extensive sedated dental work done and it was all covered by Medicaid. Melinda’s one concern is that she feels that Angela’s dentist may have been able to catch some of her dental problems earlier if Melinda had started taking Angela to the dentist at a younger age. “I do think it’s kind of crazy how medical care and dental care are so separate. Even though we feel like we are getting really good medical care for her, her primary pediatrician was not saying, you need to take her to the dentist this year, even though she’s only one year old, just to see what’s going on. Somebody should have been telling us that. It wasn’t until it was to a crisis point that we took her to be seen and realized that there was all this horrible decay. I think that that’s not an uncommon story. I know that the pediatric dentist feels . . . that he’s seeing all these cases that should have been referred to him much sooner, and never were. I know he feels that the time line for checking out children’s teeth is too late. By the time they’re seen at age five, all their baby teeth have been in there for all this time and you could have seen decay happening but nobody ever looked.”

Illustration by Dennis Pacheco.

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