A Personal Story: Paying for Prevention – Sue, Vershire

Sue lives in Vershire, Vermont. She does not have dental insurance through her job but she has always made sure she gets regular cleanings and does as much preventative care as she can. “Any time there’s been a crown or a filling–luckily we haven’t had too many of those things–we would pay for it.” When her children were younger and Sue and her husband weren’t sure whether or not they would need braces, they enrolled in a dental insurance plan and paid the premium. One of their children did need braces, which was partially covered, and Sue and her husband got several crowns done between them while they had the insurance, “But then it became ridiculously expensive, month after month paying hundreds of dollars,” for the insurance. So they finally decided to drop the dental insurance and now they pay for whatever care they need. “We will pay for whatever comes up so that we don’t end up with infections and root canals and all that kind of stuff.”

Sue and her husband have an interesting savings plan for their health care and dental care. They used to have a health savings account to set aside money for those kinds of expenses, and now they have an insurance plan with a high ($5,000) deductible. They have an account, contributed to by their employer, which can be used only for health care, including dental. Sue and her husband both work for the same organization, so their employer contributes $4,000 total. Once Sue and her husband have used up that money, they need only spend $1,000 more before the deductible has been met and the insurance kicks in. “It’s good because the premiums for that kind of insurance are lower.” Sue thinks her employer saves by contributing to the accounts instead of giving their employees a lower deductible.

    Leave a Reply

    Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

    Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box